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New Baby Hot Summer Weather Hacks

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Helping babies cope with the hot summer weather can be tricky so we have put together our top tips....Although we had the hottest June day for forty years the sun hasn't made much of an appearance lately, but we must be due some hot weather soon and those lucky enough to be holidaying abroad will have to contend with rising temperatures which is trickier with a new baby around. There is some great general advice out there around safer sleeping...

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New Baby Hot Summer Weather Hacks

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Helping babies cope with the hot summer weather can be tricky so we have put together our top tips....

Although we had the hottest June day for forty years the sun hasn't made much of an appearance lately, but we must be due some hot weather soon and those lucky enough to be holidaying abroad will have to contend with rising temperatures which is trickier with a new baby around. There is some great general advice out there around safer sleeping with your baby and this link (https://www.lullabytrust.org.uk/safer-sleep-advice/) is a great place to start, but as always, if you are worried about your baby give your GP or health visitor a call. In the meantime, we have put together our top tips for helping your baby cope with the hot summer weather.

Get yourself a room thermometer, then take a look at the chart below for some guidance on how to dress baby at bedtime in the heat. This is handy information but you know your baby best so this is intended as a guide. Usually baby's room will cool down as evening turns into night so it might be worth checking the temperature again before you go to bed. It is best to check baby's temperature by gently touching the back of their neck or their tummy, it is normal for a baby's hands and feet to feel cool to the touch but this doesn't always give you an accurate indication of how warm they actually are. Just whilst the weather is particularly warm it is worth removing any waterproof mattress cover as the plastic retains heat and can cause baby to sweat.

Create as much of a breeze as possible, open the windows but draw the curtains two thirds of the way across to keep out the sun. Open a loft hatch if you have one and some of the hot air should escape upwards.

At bedtime, a quick, tepid bath before bed should cool baby down and placing some large (one litre or more) frozen bottles of water in baby's room overnight will cool the room as it melts. If you have a fan in the room, placing the bottles (or a large bowl of ice) in front of the fan will cool the air.

In the daytime it is best to dress baby in loose cotton clothing with a wide brimmed hat and any baby under 6 months old should be kept out of the sun as their delicate skin has less melanin than older children and so they will sunburn much more easily. As very young babies do not perspire effectively they can overheat very quickly so care should be taken not to leave them for too long in a very hot room or car.

If it is very warm and humid and baby gets a bit sweaty they may develop a little bit of heat rash, which looks like tiny red bumps around the neck, groin, back of the knees or crease of the elbow. If you cool baby down and remove any tight clothing this should just disappear by itself, but again if you are concerned give your GP or health visitor a call.

Dehydration can be an issue for little babies in the heat and it is worth keeping a check on how many wet nappies your baby has. A breastfed baby does not need additional water, but will probably need to feed more often, so make sure mum gets lots of cool drinks. A bottle- fed baby can have cooled, boiled water throughout the day and night in addition to their normal feeds. Again, if you think your little baby might be dehydrated, have a chat with your doctor.

We here at Babyblooms HQ hope these tips help baby (and you!) get a bit more sleep during those long, hot summer nights. Stop by again soon for more baby life hacks and new baby gift ideas.

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Rainy day activities for kids

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With the prospect of a cold and wet bank holiday weekend ahead we thought it may be useful to offer some suggestions to entertain the kids without breaking the bank.Build a DenWhat child doesn't love building a princess castle or a fortress indoors? Pick a room in the house that you don't mind being rearranged for a few hours, and use sheets and blankets and lots of pegs or butterfly clips to secure them as a roof between chairs, sofas...

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Rainy day activities for kids

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With the prospect of a cold and wet bank holiday weekend ahead we thought it may be useful to offer some suggestions to entertain the kids without breaking the bank.

Build a Den

What child doesn't love building a princess castle or a fortress indoors? Pick a room in the house that you don't mind being rearranged for a few hours, and use sheets and blankets and lots of pegs or butterfly clips to secure them as a roof between chairs, sofas and tables. Encourage your children to use their imaginations - they can create rooms inside with towels and other furniture, dress up and act out stories from their favourite books, and even have a picnic lunch or snack in their new den.

This activity should provide hours of entertainment for children of most ages, and is especially great fun when you have friends'children over for a playdate. Otheriwse, be prepared to have to crawl inside the den, enter the fantasy and make appreciative noises!

Warning: you must also prepare yourslef for the barrage of objections you will doubtless receive when it is time to put it away!
 
Fashion show spring clean

This one is a favourite with Team Babyblooms, as well as occupying the children it's also an opportunity to put a big tick on the never-ending to do list!

It's a fun way to spring clean the childrens' wardrobes - put on a fun fashion show! Place lamps in your hallway or landing and trun on some funky music, then get your kids to strutt their stuff down your makeshift catwalk. Cheer them on from your audience chair at the end of the hall, as you decide whether each item is ready for the bin or charity shop, delegated to the hand-me-down or sewing baskets, or still fine to wear for another season.Sorting through childrens' wardrobes and de-cluttering has never been so much fun!

Treasure hunt

A treasure hunt is a great way to amuse kids large and small. You can hide treats, but if you're health-conscious, hide toys instead - just use a specific set so they know what to look for, such as the Barbie collection, matchbox cars, or leftover party favours like balloons or toy whistles. Give each child a small basket to collect their loot in - they could have some fun decorating this for an extra activity. You could even let the kids create a deck of colourful picture cards to use as your scavenger pieces. To keep them engaged, offer a prize or treat for the child who brings back the most loot each round. This is a game that can be played for hours on end, with the right incentive!

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The Underwear Rule – Say Pants to Abuse

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PANTS is an acronym made up of five simple rules that we should all teach our children and discuss with them. The Underwear rule which has been devised by the NSPCC makes it easy for parents to discuss the issue of abuse with their children in a non-explicit manner whilst opening the door for communication and in so doing helps parents to tackle this difficult subject and to protect their children.

The Underwear Rule is a simple way that parents can help keep children safe from abuse by teaching them that:

  • their body belongs to them
  • they have a right to say no
  • they should tell an adult if they’re upset or worried
  • We know talking to your child about their private parts and staying safe can seem difficult, but doesn’t have to be scary or mention sex.
  • Simple conversations can help children understand that their body is their own and help protect them from abuse.

P= Privates are Private

A= Always remember your body belongs to you

N= No means no

T= Talk about secrets that upset you

S= Speak up – someone can help

Source: NSPCC Website

For more information visit: https://www.nspcc.org.uk/help-and-advice/for-parents/keeping-your-child-safe/the-underwear-rule/the-underwear-rule_wda97016.html#downloads

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PANTS is an acronym made up of five simple rules that we should all teach our children and discuss with them. The Underwear rule which has been devised by the NSPCC makes it easy for parents to discuss the issue of abuse with their children in a non-explicit manner whilst opening the door for communication and in so doing helps parents to tackle this difficult subject and to protect their children.

The Underwear Rule is a simple way that parents can help keep children safe from abuse by teaching them that:

  • their body belongs to them
  • they have a right to say no
  • they should tell an adult if they’re upset or worried
  • We know talking to your child about their private parts and staying safe can seem difficult, but doesn’t have to be scary or mention sex.
  • Simple conversations can help children understand that their body is their own and help protect them from abuse.

P= Privates are Private

A= Always remember your body belongs to you

N= No means no

T= Talk about secrets that upset you

S= Speak up – someone can help

Source: NSPCC Website

For more information visit: https://www.nspcc.org.uk/help-and-advice/for-parents/keeping-your-child-safe/the-underwear-rule/the-underwear-rule_wda97016.html#downloads

Read more